Tag Archives: Arcas

Arcas – Sample 5

© Art by JC Thomas from ARCAS

Below you’ll find pages 9-12 of the upcoming graphic novel Arcas. These pages correspond to roughly the first half of the script pages from Arcas – Sample 2. Enjoy.

Arcas Page 09 (Art by J.C. Thomas)
Arcas Page 09, illustrated by JC Thomas
Arcas Page 010, illustrated by JC Thomas
Arcas Page 10, illustrated by JC Thomas
Arcas Page 11, illustrated by JC Thomas
Arcas Page 11, illustrated by JC Thomas
Arcas Page 12, illustrated by JC Thomas
Arcas Page 12, illustrated by JC Thomas


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Arcas – Sample 4

© Art by JC Thomas from ARCAS

Below you’ll find the pages 6-8 of the upcoming graphic novel Arcas. These pages correspond to roughly the second half of the script pages from Arcas – Sample 1, and are in progress pages. Minor amendments to copy are still pending, but the art begged to be shared. Enjoy.

Arcas page 6, illustrated by JC Thomas
Arcas page 6, illustrated by JC Thomas
Arcas page 7, illustrated by JC Thomas
Arcas page 7, illustrated by JC Thomas
Arcas page 8, illustrated by JC Thomas
Arcas page 8, illustrated by JC Thomas


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Arcas – Sample 3

© Art by JC Thomas from ARCAS

Below you’ll find the first 5 pages of the upcoming graphic novel Arcas, beautifully illustrated by JC Thomas. These pages correspond to roughly the first half of the script pages from Arcas – Sample 1.

Arcas International Space Station

Arcas page 1, illustrated by JC Thomas

Panning from entry ladder down spacestation corridor into central as laughter can be heard

Arcas Page 2, illustrated by JC Thomas

Pan into dining area across bolted down chairs and into common room

Arcas Page 3, illustrated by JC Thomas

Pan through common area by entertainment viewing corner, workout area, and to a Foosball table

Arcas Page 4, illustrated by JC Thomas

Pan out of common area, into a view room with seats facing screens that show the Jovian system.  Voices over each panel. Voice 1"You Cheat" Voice 2 "You lose poorly" Voice 2 "You're up." Voice 3 "I'm busy" Voice 2 "Too bad. Time for R & R, Gant."

Arcas Page 5, illustrated by JC Thomas


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Arcas – Sample 2

© Art by JC Thomas from ARCAS

Below you’ll find the second writing sample for ARCAS. These are pages for the original short film from which the comic is being adapted. Enjoy!

ARCAS

By

Chris Hutton

Story by

Marielle Woods and Chris Hutton

INT. CENTRAL WORKSTATION – DAY

Computers everywhere. Floor to ceiling. Two booth-like stations screened off to either side of a two-seated central monitor area. More seats at less important stations.

Sam taps a button. Casual. He’s done this a million times.

SAM

Say again, Artemis Base?

ARTEMIS DIRECTOR (SPEAKER)

We are good for launch. Copy Arcas Station? Good for launch.

Sam blows at the steam from his coffee and grabs a sesame seed from a pile. He holds the seed through an air hole of a mouse cage; EDDY, the mouse, noses at the offering.

SAM

Check. EECOM?

COMMANDER SITWELL (SPEAKER)

Go.

SAM

Hydraulics?

COMMANDER SITWELL (SPEAKER)

All go, Sam. Prep the mess hall, we’ll be back in time for lunch.

SAM

Hallelujah, sir.

COMMANDER SITWELL (SPEAKER)

Our resident cynic been giving you a hard time?

SAM

Not at all, sir – just ready to kick someone else’s butt after six months playing with that cheat.

COMMANDER SITWELL (SPEAKER)

You just want us back so I’ll sign your release and get you off that orbiting tin can and down here where the real action is.

SAM

Just ready to do my part–

An orange light blinks on the console, lit then gone.

SAM (CONT’D)

Hold. I had a flicker on booster 3.

COMMANDER SITWELL (SPEAKER)

Copy. Likely a short, again. Still reading?

Sam stares. No light. Finally presses the button to speak.

SAM

No. I’d like to call in Xu. Advise.

COMMANDER SITWELL (SPEAKER)

Negative. All reads well on board and at Artemis Base. Relay Ship II is good for launch. Let’s go.

SAM

Copy that Commander. See you soon.

A timer begins on the monitor: “30. 29. 28…” Sam glances to the thruster light. Still off. Pauses on it.

“23. 22. 21…”

The light remains unlit. Sam runs his hand through his hair.

“17. 16. 15…”

Sam tenses in his seat as Eddy perches up by an air hole. He grins at the mouse, then turns back to the count down.

“10. 9. 8…”

He leans forward: “7. 6…”

COMMANDER SITWELL (SPEAKER)

— Go in five. Four. Three. Two. One.

The THRUSTERS ENGAGE blasting over the speaker. No warning light. Sam taps nervously. The THRUSTERS INCREASE VOLUME.

COMMANDER SITWELL (SPEAKER) (CONT’D)

Clear of Artemis Base. ETA, one hour, 37 minutes.

SAM

Copy. I’ll put out the welcome mat.

Sam sighs and leans back. Turns to Eddy with another seed.

SAM

How’s that for a start to the day,
Eddy?

(re: Eddy won’t take it)

No?

Sam shrugs and cracks the seed open for himself when — BOOM!

COMMANDER SITWELL (SPEAKER)

Command Module abort! Abort!

ASTRONAUT 1 (SPEAKER)

System jammed. Come in, system —

— STATIC.

A NEW LIGHT FLASHES! Sam wheels to the neighboring console. All calculated action. Flipping switches.

SAM

Relay II come in?

(STATIC)

Relay shuttle, come in.

(STATIC)

Commander Sitwell? Ben?

Still STATIC. SAM drops his head for a moment, taking it in, then flips the next switch.

SAM (CONT’D)

Artemis Base, come in.

ARTEMIS DIRECTOR (SPEAKER)

This is Artemis base. We’ve lost visual —

BOOM! And more STATIC.

SAM

Artemis —

A station ALARM SOUNDS. Sam swivels to — THE MONITOR: “Incoming.” Sam braces.

Another BOOM! This time not over the speakers. Sam shields his eyes as SPARKS fly out from overhead. Coolant billows down drowning the fire before it can take hold.

A GRINDING NOISE WRENCHES through the station. Everything shakes. Sam’s coffee crashes to the floor!

The mouse cage slips over the edge, falling. Sam reaches for it, then…

Slowly the mouse cage begins to float rather than fall. Sam pushes it down and the cage suctions to the console, but the maneuver thrusts him up into the air. Welcome to zero G.

SAM (CONT’D)

No, no, no.

(flips switch)

Xu!



Back to Sample 1


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Arcas – Sample 1

© Art by JC Thomas from ARCAS

Below you’ll find the first writing sample for ARCAS. These are pages for the original short film from which the comic is being adapted. Enjoy!

ARCAS

By

Chris Hutton

Story by

Marielle Woods and Chris Hutton

FADE IN:

INT. STORAGE ROOM – DAWN

A CIRCULAR HATCH dominates the ceiling above a built-in LADDER, the rungs just visible in the pre-dawn light. Down the ladder, stowage strapped in, covering every inch of the cramped room.

The only exception: an open doorway.  Barely audible sounds of MIRTH carry in hints of life.

INT. HALLWAY – CONTINUOUS

Smooth walls.  The architecture resembles a boat interior – hidden compartments in floors and walls – all items secured on brackets, lipped shelves, etc. Very smooth. Unadorned.

The hall branches. From one path the sounds heighten: LAUGHTER? We flow from room to room following the source.

INT. MESS ROOM – CONTINUOUS

Yes, definitely LAUGHTER. It echoes in this, the first open space – a vast and empty dining room. Wide and clean with an air of comfort, drowned in loneliness.

More LAUGHTER sounds, then… a voice? Too QUIET to tell.

INT. COMMON ROOM – CONTINUOUS

Another large room. In one corner: an in-wall video console and chairs bolted down. A second corner holds shelves of books and stowage, and yet another, exercise equipment, including a few WEIGHTS, all secured.

The final corner: a games shelf, a card table, and a glass-topped FOOSBALL table. The CLATTER of a Foosball game mixes with the LAUGHTER.

For all its mirth, the room is still empty. Finally voices:

XU (V.O.)

GOOAALLL!

INT. HALLWAY – CONTINUOUS

Back in the same hallway, but further down. The voices here are louder. At the end of the hall…

… an open doorway. Massive and metal. All the doors, even those camouflaged to be normal, hint at a solid build with air-tight seals.

COMMANDER SITWELL (V.O.)

You cheat!

XU (V.O.)

You lose poorly.

Halfway to the open door, another room viewed in passing.

INT. VIEWING ROOM – CONTINUOUS

REVEAL: A vast window displaying a vista of Jupiter and its many moons.  Empty chairs hold a silent vigil over the expanse of space. Still the voices sound.

XU (V.O.)

You’re up.

INT. HALLWAY – CONTINUOUS

Continuing down to the final open door.

SAM (V.O.)

I’m busy.

XU (V.O.)

Too bad. Time for R & R, Gant.

INT. SLEEPING QUARTERS – CONTINUOUS

True dawn now, as if a sunrise peaks within the bunk style sleeping quarters. All empty save for two beds.

XU (O.S.)

(half asleep)

Gant.

SAMUEL “SAM” GANT – late 20s, athletic, with close cut hair – perches on the edge of a bottom bunk over a monitor. Possibly a quarterback or young marine, definitely the all-star.

ON MONITOR: Security footage. On it —

— SAM leans over a console in the COMMON ROOM. XU JINHAI – Chinese, early 40s – beckons from the Foosball table. Wiry and gruff, he’d appear jaded if not for the joy in his voice.

XU (ON MONITOR) (CONT’D)

The printers can wait five minutes. Schooling you…

SAM (ON MONITOR)

(turns to XU; all grin)

Schooling me, my ass, XU.

XU (O.S.)

Gant.

BACK ON BUNKS: Sam pauses the video.

SAM

Right there, I turned. That’s the moment. Printer 12 threw a glitch —

XU (O.S.)

Gant!

— a PILLOW SLAMS into Sam from above.  “Edith Hamilton’s Mythology” flies down with it, a photograph fluttering out.

REVEAL: Xu glares down from a top bunk.

SAM

(tosses back pillow)

I missed the warning on truss twelve’s printer. I should’ve —

XU

— should’ve nothing. People make mistakes – even you. Watch it one more time, I’m deleting that log.

SAM

But had I —

XU

— No. With Sitwell lunar-side I’m the ranking officer and I order you to let me sleep.

SAM

Yes, sir.

(makes to leave)

One more thing.

(re: Xu eyes him)

You’re so purty when you’re sleepy.

XU

(pillow smothers himself)

My god! Let me sleep or so help me, I’m going to kill you!

SAM

Aye, aye, captain.

Sam hands Xu the mythology book stuffing a picture of Xu and his YOUNG SON back among the pages. As Xu takes the book, Sam flips a button and Venetian-like slats close over two false windows blocking out the artificial dawn.


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Why Go It Alone?

          For about six years I strove to make it as a writer virtually on my own. One could make an argument that it was a much longer stint than that if you count my college years (which is a different discussion entirely), but then one would be a real ass. Plenty of people spend nearly a decade in college and aren’t doctors. Seriously let’s not pick at this one.

          The point is I spent the majority of the past decade writing and sending my work out into the ether with no real luck, and that is if I found an avenue down which I could submit my writing at all. The hardest part of writing for me is, and likely always will be, getting my writing into someone else’s hands.

          You see that is the real crux of it. Many writers like myself like to believe that writing is a solitary thing, some dark art conjured forth in our hermit caves where the light of day is never seen, and the outside world plays no role. Unfortunately (or otherwise… I’m still debating on this one), writing is far less solitary than one might want to believe. At the very least one core partnership must exist: the writer and the reader.

          At the start that reader is likely a close friend, a significant other, colleagues in a writer’s group, or some combination thereof. But beyond the reader, a good editor is a critical partner for any writer – a partnership we often overlook to our own detriment. Add in the numerous partnerships necessary to realize one’s writing as a comic, a film, or television series, and the truth is that very few of us write completely alone even if much of the core work is done in isolation.

          With that being the case, why is it so many writers resist partnerships? I wish I had an answer. Maybe if I did I would have realized the value in partnerships a long time ago.

          Suffice to say, after years of working on solo projects, a few years back I finally opened up to the idea of partnerships. My colleague and friend, Marielle Woods, came to me with an idea for a near-future, science-fiction short. The amazing director that she is I knew that working together we could create something wonderful.

          I worked on outlines and drafts, collaborating with Marielle until we had a polished script ready for the festival circuit. We entered the script in a small sample of competitions for testing and while the script did not advance to finals it did catch the interest of a reader who later approached me regarding adapting the script into a graphic novel. Now, our script, Arcas, is being illustrated and published by the talented JC Thomas. This is not only a fortuitous outcome in that it helps us realize our story and distribute it to an audience, but also in that it is the start of another great partnership, one in which plans for subsequent adaptations are already being discussed.

          Flashing back to just a month after Marielle and I began working together, I started a direct writing partnership with my friend Jonathan Fischer, working on a separate science-fiction piece. We built a massive world full of beautifully rich characters and alternate histories, and he, with a talent for networking that has ever eluded me, began pitching the idea.

          And we were shot down.

          But, that pitch peaked interest and led us to developing five separate one-hour drama pitches, formalizing a legal writing partnership, and has paved the way towards pitching our multiple series’ ideas. Where it goes from there I cannot yet say, but I look forward to finding the answer.

          None of this is to say, ‘Look at me, and look at what I’m doing – isn’t it amazing?’ – at least not on a conscious level. The goal of this rant is simply this: years of going it alone may have honed my writing some, but it did little to progress my career. No one is a master of all trades. In particular, I am a shambles when it comes to networking and getting read. But partnerships, good partnerships, compensate for your weaknesses with the strengths of your partner and create a force greater than the sum of its parts.

          So if you’ve been trying to go it alone for a little too long, maybe it’s time you look to your friends and your colleagues and see if there just might be a future collaboration in the making. So far, I have no regrets.

          Happy writing!